Out of the Doghouse

Out of the Doghouse: A Step-by-Step Relationship-Saving Guide for Men Caught Cheating

by Robert Weiss, LCSW. (2017)

Get Out of the Doghouse and Back into Your Marriage!

Men and women are very different when it comes to relationships, and this difference is amplified when a man cheats. While men are able to compartmentalize things like casual sex, women typically view any form of cheating as an affront to their entire relationship. They think: “If he is lying to me about sex, he’s probably lying to me about everything.” For betrayed women, trust just flat-out disintegrates. Without proper guidance, men–who are often unaware of the type and degree of pain they have caused their spouse–have little chance of restoring it.

Underneath the hurt and betrayal, usually there is still love. Where there is love and motivation for change, there is hope for the relationship to move forward. Robert Weiss, a nationally acclaimed expert in the treatment of sex, infidelity, and intimacy issues, has spent over 25 years helping couples find peace and healing. In “Out of the Doghouse” he shares his expertise, illuminating the concrete steps men can take to rebuild trust, restore intimacy, and save their primary relationship. He also gives direction to women on how to know when it is okay to move beyond fear, suspicion, and remorse to a place of hope and relationship renewal.

The Couple Connection

The Couple Connection

CoupleConnection is a ‘do it yourself’ relationship support service run by OnePlusOne, the UK’s leading relationship research organisation. It puts a wealth of research and practical experience into your hands, thus empowering couples to work on their relationships. The site provides a wide range of articles, self-assessment tools, activities, quizzes, exercises and courses to help you to improve and strengthen your relationship.

 

http://thecoupleconnection.net/quizzes

Love Quiz: Do You Really Know Your Partner?

Love Quiz: Do You Really Know Your Partner?

From The Gottman Institute, A Research-Based Approach to Strengthening Relationships

Worldwide leaders in research and couples therapy, Drs. John and Julie Gottman have found that one of the most important characteristics of successful relationships is the quality of the friendship between partners.

Do you really know your partner?

Take our quiz below to find out.

Love Quiz: Do You Really Know Your Partner?

How to Understand Your Partner and Get Your Needs Met

How to Understand Your Partner and Get Your Needs Met

Couples therapists explain why mutual understanding can be mutually satisfying

By Diane Barth, LCSW, Off the Couch

Posted March 17, 2012

At PsychologyToday.com

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-couch/201203/how-understand-your-partner-and-get-your-needs-met

Relationship Quiz

Relationship Quiz

By Julienne B. Derichs, LCPC, is a Couples Counselor, writer, and adjunct faculty at National – Louis University.

The quiz was developed by Julienne Derichs, expert couples counselor. The Relationship Checkup is a list of 11 points that will help you evaluate your relationship. These points are based on research completed separately by psychologists Judith Wallerstein and John Gottman.

http://www.jbdcounseling.com/Relationship-Check-Up.html

Conversational Style Makes or Breaks Relationships

That’s Not What I Meant!: How Conversational Style Makes or Breaks Relationships, by Deborah Tannen. (2011)

“Tannen combines a novelist’s ear for the way people speak with a rare power of original analysis….Fascinating.”
—Oliver Sacks, author of The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and The Mind’s Eye

In That’s Not What I Meant!, Deborah Tannen, renowned communication expert and author of the New York Times bestsellers You’re Wearing THAT? and You Just Don’t Understand, explores how conversational styles can make or break interpersonal relationships at home, at work, or at play. Fans of her books and the healthily curious reader interested in popular psychology, feminism, linguistics, or social sciences will be fascinated by Tannen’s remarkable insights into unintentional conversational confusion.  That’s Not What I Meant! is an essential guide to recognizing and adjusting what we say and how we are saying it in order to strengthen or save a relationship.

Building Loving Relationships

Hold Me Tight: Your Guide to the Most Successful Approach to Building Loving Relationships, by Sue Johnson. (2011)

Developed by Dr. Sue Johnson over 20 years ago and practiced all over the world, EFT has been heralded by Time magazine and the New York Times as the couple therapy with the highest rate of success. Couples who use EFT see a 75 per cent success rate. The therapy program focuses on the emotional connection of every relationship by de-escalating conflict, creating a safe emotional connection, and strengthening bonds between partners. In HOLD ME TIGHT, EFT pioneer Dr. Sue Johnson presents her highly effective therapy model to the general public for the first time. Through case studies from her practice, illuminating advice and practical exercises, couples will learn how to nurture their relationships and ensure a lifetime of love.

Mindful Loving

Mindful Loving: 10 Practices for Creating Deeper Connections, by Henry Greyson, PhD. (2004)

In this groundbreaking book, Dr. Henry Grayson shares his breakthrough techniques for creating deeper and more lasting connections with our loved ones. Henry Grayson, a psychologist, relationship counselor, psychoanalyst, and former minister who has been working with couples and individuals to improve their relationships for over thirty years, has found that most people are actually more unhappy after marriage counseling or couples therapy. In Mindful Loving he sets aside the traditional methods of therapy to show you how to look at your relationships from a completely different perspective. By getting to the root of our relationship problems, which stem from our thoughts and beliefs and mistaken ideas about our own identities, Grayson creates a whole new framework—one where psychology, spirituality, and science meet—in which to view intimacy.